Archaeological Museum

Archaeological Museum

A visit to the Archaeological Museum which has been installed in a building specially built for it, will answer most of the questions the visitor has been asking him-self as he walked around the ancient city. The items on display have been carefully chosen in order to cover every aspect of Palmyrene civilization through-out the ages; they are many but there is little repetition or duplication. There are informative labels in Arabic and French. Points of particular interest ate illustrated by large charts. There is thus little point in going into detail about the collections in this guide. A few land-marks will be sufficient. The entrance hall is devoted to prehistory - depicted in a series of highly realistic dioramas. The room to the right of the entrance shows the evolutions of the Palmyrene script.

In the next room there are religious sculptures. One of the most beautiful is a carved lintel on which the god Baalshamin, "God of the Heavens", is depicted as an eagle with outstretched wings and smaller eagles by its side, each with an olive branch in its beak; also beside it are figures of the gods of the sun and moon with light beaming from their heads. There is also a great model of the Temple of Bel as it was when it was built. In the third room there are sculptures mostly from public buildings. They depict everyday life, commerce, honors. In them people are dressed either in local costumes: a long down under a wide cloak worn round the shoulders, or in Parthian dress: a tunic worn over trousers tucked into boots. The pack or army dromedaries wear harness very similar to that used today.

The gallery that leads back to the entrance contains many representations of the various gods of Palmyra notably of Yarhibol, the sun god, dressed in Palmyrene costume. The three rooms and gallery on the left of the entrance hall are occupied mainly by splendid funerary sculptures. The actual tomb chests in the hypogeia were sealed by limestone slabs on which the deceased was depicted, as if alive, in high relief, in an attitude of serenity. Various details reveals his social rank or symbolize traits. One hand is generally open, as a token of resignation in the face of death, while the other clasps some familiar object to indicate attachment to life.
In the museum there are many collections of objects explanatory panels, and reconstruction - with life-size wax figures - which together constitute a veritable museum of the Syrian desert and its traditions Certain scenes show everyday life in the oasis of Tadmor, others depict nomadic life which is gradually -disappearing today. Family life is portrayed most real-istically, with all the appropriate clothes chests and tools, appropriately arranged, and models of men and women going about their household tasks. Elsewhere the range of Palmyrene craft-work is displayed - rugs -trays, made of straw, leather and wickerwork. The production of turpentine is also shown, with the special press that is used. The turpentine tree, the rare plant much sought after by Egyptians for the mummification of their dead, grows in abundance on the hills around Palmyra.
In other rooms, camels, Arab horses, tents and the desert itself with the animals that live there - eagles, falcons, wolves, and hyenas - help to illustrate the life of the nomadic Bedouin, a people whose social structures, adapted over centuries to severe conditions of life, have been severely shaken by the development of the economy, by modern transport and by changes in customs and behavior.

 
     

www.advancedtrave.org  /  www.pyramids-miditation.com / www.meditation-pyramids.com www.seektemplates.com www.salvage-info.com www.goodhandsit.com www.PSDTEMPLATESDVD.COM www.TEMPLATESSOURCE.NET www.kiddiegames.org www.bmwservicemanual.com www.dodo-games.com www.NJARABDATING.COM www.NYARABDATING.COM